Bharat Sevak Samaj

The constitution of the Bharat Sevak Samaj and the National Advisory Committee for Public Cooperation in August 1952, are important preliminary steps recently taken for securing public cooperation on a nationwide basis. The National Advisory Committee, which is representative of different sections of opinion in the country, is expected to : 1. review and assess the programmes of public co-operation in relation to national development ; 2. dvise the Planning Commission from time to time regarding the progress of public co-operation in relation to the fulfilment of the National Plan ; 3. receive reports from the Central Board of the Bharat Sevak Samaj and consider such specific matters as may be referred to it for advice by the Central Board ;and 4. make suggestions and recommendations to the Central Board of the Bharat Sevak Samaj on matters of policy and on programmes relating to public eo-opera-tion.

Bharat Sevak Samaj 18. The Bharat Sevak Samaj has been conceived of as a non-political and non-official national platform for constructive work. The primary objects of the Samaj are— (1) to find and develop avenues of voluntary service for the citizens of India to— a. promote national sufficiency and build up the economic strength of the country, b. to promote the social well-being of the community and to mitigate the privations and hardships of its less favoured sections ; and 2) to draw out the available unused time, energy and other resources of the people and direct them into various fields of social and economic activity. The work of the Samaj, which is being undertaken on a nationwide scale, is at present in the initial stages of its organisation. The Bharat Sevak Samaj provides a common platform for all who wish to give their share of time and energy to developing the people’s own effort in relation to the National Plan and, at the same time, it is intended to assist in the development of existing voluntary organisations. ttp://planningcommission. nic. in/reports/peoreport/cmpdmpeo/volume1/stof60. pdf PEO Study No. 37 A STUDY OF THE LOK KARYA KSHETRAS ‘ OF THE BHARAT SEVAK SAMAJ, 1960 1. The Study Govt. of India had been giving grants to Bharat Sevak Samaj, a non-political Voluntary Organisation for running 50 Lok Karya Kshetras, mostly located in rural areas. The scheme was intended to secure public participation in various development programmes in rural Sector, both in areas covered by the Community Development Programme and outside.

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The evaluation study of some Lok Karya Kshetras was undertaken by the Programme Evaluation Organisation at the instance of Public Cooperation Division of Planning Commission to assess the role and work of Kshetras so that the suitable modifications could be introduced in the programme on the basis of the results of the evaluation. 2. Objectives The extent to which the objectives of the . Lok Karya Kshetra Programme as mentioned in the Scheme of Bharat Sevak Samaj are understood, accepted and put into practice. ii) The manner in which the programmes are planned and decisions regarding priorities and targets taken. ii) The achievements, in particular the measure in which the Lok Karya Kshetra workers have been helpful in achieving the larger targets in Community Development. iv) Cooperation and coordination with the Block staff and with officials of development departments in Planning & Implementation of specific projects, in particular, (a) whether the Gram Sahayaks accept the Lok Karya Kshetra workers and how far they work with them? (b) whether the setting up of Lok Karya Kshetras does not give rise to rivalaries between the workers of C. D.

Ministry and those of Bharat Sevak Samaj? (c) Which activities can the Bharat Sevak Samaj workers perform better than the Village Level Worker and vice-versa. v) The qualities, -the attitudes and the abilities of Lok Karya Kshetra workers and the type of workers most suitable for the programme. vi) The adequacy of the training imparted to the workers. vii) The Development of local resources achieved through the programme. viii) The extent and method of cooperation with Local institutions like Panchayats and cooperatives and the members of the local community. x) The extent of cooperation with other voluntary organizations working in the same field, X) The degree of acceptance of the Lok Karya Kshetra workers by the people and their impact on the village; xi) The attitude of the people towards their village, their nation and the Lok Karya Kshetra/Bharat Sevak Samaj. Sample Size A stratified sample of 11 kshetras which started work in October, 1958 was selected. The best projects in each selected Lok Karya Kshetra were also studied in some detail with a view to draw lessons from their working. . Reference Period The data collected were related to the period from October, 1958 and onwards. 5. Main Findings 1. The Lok Kerya Kshetras worker had broad understanding of the objectives of the programme but they put emphasis between the various purposes some what differently than the national planners. At the national level, stress was laid on family production plan, resource development and food production. The workers put the emphasis on construction, health, education and local institutions in addition to agriculture. . While national planning put great emphasis on irrigation, that seemed to be the view of the Lok Kerya Kshetra workers too, the villagers placed roads as the first item in rural planning. Again, while villagers attached great importance to the supply of seeds, fertilizers and other aids to agricultural production, these items seemed to occupy quite a low position in the workers scale. 3. There was further divergence between the workers understanding of the programme and the plan of work drawn up by them.

A good proportion of Kshetras had no settled plans and where some sort of planning had been done, propaganda and publicity, sanitation, construction and repair of roads figured more prominently than promotion of irrigation or food production. This was also reflected in the activities actually undertaken by the Lok Karya Kshetras in the areas studied. The Lok Karya Kshetras had been interested chiefly in the construction and repair of roads, digging of tanks and wells, sanitation work, digging of compost pits, strengthening of cooperatives and schools and istribution of milk. 4. While the working relations between the Lok Karya Kshetras  and the C. D.. workers were satisfactory and they helped each other, when approached, the programmes of the two organisations were not coordinated and also the consultation-between them had not been put on a firm basis. 5. The link of the Karya Kshetras with intermediate units at the district and state level was weak. 6. In most Karyatshetras , the accounts were not properly kept and the monthly statements were not submitted regularly to the Central office. 7.

Most centres suffered from time-lag between their creation and the selection and appointment of workers. No adequate arrangements were made for screening the candidates for the position of Sahyogies and up-sahyogies in all the centres studied except those Kendras where a regular  Board was constituted, posts were advertised and applications screened and the selected names sent to the Central Bharat Sevak Samaj for final approval. 8. In most cases, the Lok Karya Kshetra workers adopted the group approach which was considered to be a proper method of work for solving the problems of the Village Community. . Some Bharat Sevak Samaj Centres had taken up commencial activities such as running fair price shops with a view to curb profiteering and corrupt practices of intermediaries. 10. The data collected to assess the people’s attitude revealed that a large majority of the respondents expressed their willingness to contribute their best, if Govt. helped them. 11. A little more than half the respondents reported that the work of the Bharat Sevak Samaj in their areas was successful. only about 17 per cent considered it very successful. 1 per cent were ignorant of it and about 19 per cent thought that it had failed. The villagers were more familier with the Lok Karya Kshetra workers than with the block staff, even though the block staff were regular government employees and were expected to work regularly in the villges. 6. Major Suggestions 1. More funds should be placed at the disposal of the workers of the Bharat Sevak Samaj in order to enable them to extend their cultural, recreational and publicity activities. More equipments e. g. ycles, first aid boxes etc should be provided to them. There should be better coordination between the Lok Karya Kshetras and official bodies, besides better selection and more intensive training of the workers and better remuneration for them. The Government should issue instructions to the officers and the workers of Community Development and other development departments to cooperate with them and keep them informed of their plans and programmes. 2. The Bharat Sevak Samaj was trying to undertake all programmes of benefit to the rural people.

But the samaj had neither the personnel nor other resources for such a comprehensive undertaking. The workers also did not possess the technical know how required in various fields e. g. agriculture, sanitation etc. In view of the above limitations the Lok Karya Kshetra should concentrate on programmes of rural welfare which could be undertaken successfully through public participation. 3. There should be close coordination between the activities of the Block organisation and the Lok Karya Kshetras.

Lok Karya Kshetras after preparing their yearly programme of action should discuss it with the Block,Development Committee. 4. The Bharat Sevak Samaj workers suggested more publicity, propaganda, more cultural shows and greater association of village leaders. 5. The links at the state and the district level between the Central Bharat Sevak Samaj in New Delhi and the Lok Karya Kshetra in the villages should be created, strengthened to provide the Lok Karya Kshetras with some guidance at close quarters and some supervision of the working of the committees. 6.

The Lok Karya Kshetra should explore local sources of income to meet their needs and rely on the Government for marginal aid only. 7. While the Lok Karya Kshetras must enjoy a certain amount of latitude in respect of the use of their resources, they should keep their account properly in order to prevent misuse of funds, and avoid raising suspicion. 8. Lok Karya Kshetra should not undertake commercial enterprises like running of fair price shops. 9. Lok Karya Kshetras should enjoy the freedom to adopt the technique and the approach best suited to the area where it was located. nly some broad principles should be recommended for general guidance. Environmental social service including personal hygiene, sanitation, home nursing, child care, care of the sick, sewing and tailoring etc. During the current financial year universities, State Govern- ments, the ational Cadet Corps of the Ministry of Defence and voluntary organisations, of which the most important are the Bharat Sevak Samaj and the Bharat Scouts and Guides, organised a large number of camps of different types all over the country.

During the period between 1st April, and 31st December, 1958 a sum of Rs. 32. 78 lakhs was sanctioned for holding 1,762 camps with a total strength of 1,38,987 campers. http://www. education. nic. in/cd50years/15/8P/8A/8P8A0703. htm SECOND FIVE YEAR PLAN 30. Young men and women and students from colleges and schools are taking an increasing share in the tasks of national development. The first five year plan made a special provision for youth camps and labour services.

Up to October 1955, at the instance of the Ministry of Education 795 youth camps had been organised in which 66,000 persons participated. These camps create a sense of dignity in manual labour, provide new interests and bring together different sections of the community. Valuable work has been done by the National Cadet Corps which has now a strength of 46,000 in its senior division, 64,000 in the junior division anti 8,000 in the girls division besides 3,000 teachers and others drawn from educational institutions. The Auxiliary Cadet Corps has now a strength of 750,000.

The Bharat Scouts and Guides have a membership of 438,405 scouts and 61,118 guides which represents an increase of 50 per cent since the beginning of the first plan. The Bharat Sevak Samaj has organised nearly 500 youth and students camps in which about 40,000 youth and students have taken part. All these organisations have ambitious programmes of development for the second five year plan. Youth and students have a unique contribution to make to the building of the nation and it is the aim of the plan to give them growing opportunities of service and participation. 1. In connection with the formulation of the second five year plan, an effort has been recently initiated to secure the close association of teachers and students with work in the field of planning. At the suggestion of the Planning Commission, planning forums have been formed in a number of universities and colleges to enable teachers and students to consider problems relating to national development and to send their suggestions to the Planning Commission, State Governments and local bodies.

It is hoped that in due course such forums or associations will be formed in all universities and other educational institutions. By disseminating information and creating a more widespread under-standing of national, state and local plans and in organizing voluntary work or development projects, planning forums will provide valuable opportunities to teachers and students to contribute to the success of the second five year plan. 32. As a non-political and non-official organisation set up in pursuance of the first five year plan, the Bharat Sevak Samaj has served as a national platform for constructive work.

It has now 31 Pradesh branches and 229 district branches, besides branches in tahsil or taluka towns and in villages. The total membership of persons who have agreed to give five hours of social service during the week now runs to 50,000. In addition to a small number of whole-time employees, the Bharat Sevak Samaj has been able to attract a number of retired and experienced public servants for its programme of work, which now includes social education, health and sanitation, labour cooperatives, work centres, youth and student camps, information centres and cultural activities.

Besides implementing its own programmes, the Bharat Sevak Samaj also works in association with other social service organisations. Five of its branches are running welfare extension projects under the schemes of the Central Social Welfare Board. Special arrangements have been made for training camp leaders. Some of the camps have been organised on behalf of education departments and university authorities. A youth organisation named the Bharat Yuvak Samaj has been recently sponsored by the Samaj.

Among activities undertaken by the Bharat Sevak Samaj, mention may be made of the construction of 16 1/2 miles of embankment at the Kosi project work on the Jumna bund, establishment of cooperative societies, assistance in the small savings movement and participation in local development works. 33. Many of the basic ideas of Gandhiji have become part of the national heritage. Methods and techniques which he and those associated with him in constructive work developed over many years have been found to be of great value of working rural programmes.

The tradition of service which they embodied and their emphasis on village reconstruction. http://education. nic. in/cd50years/15/8P/89/8P890J01. htm PUBLIC COOPERATION IN THE FIRST TWO PLANS 9. It was realised at the time of the formulation of the First Five Year Plan that for rapid progress public cooperation will have to be enlisted on a very large scale in every aspect of development The Bharat Sevak Samaj was formed to provide a common platform with the object of drawing out the available unused time and energy of the people and directing them into various fields of social and economic activity.

The Samaj has adopted a comprehensive programme and has branches all over the country. It has a large cadre of trained workers. Its association with the Kosi project during 1955-59 has brought forth evidence of the large possibilities of reducing cost, improving quality of performance and speeding up completion of various projects through public participation. Against the original estimates of Rs. 11. 5 crores, the actual expenditure on the Kosi embankment scheme came down to Rs. 6. 5 crores. The work was completed in 1958 against target date of 1960, i. e. 2 years in advance.

The Samaj has taken part on a smaller scale in the construction of several other irrigation and flood protection projects. Encouraged by its experience it has set up a Construction Service with branches in several States. It has undertaken construction of a variety of public works. The Organisation of works camps for students and youth of the country in connection with the Labour and Social Service Camps scheme of the Ministry of Education has become a major activity of the Samaj in which the contribution of the people is becoming available in an increasing measure.

A specific approach has now been worked out in respect of activities in the rural areas. A group of villages is selected as the field of activity of two or three trained social workers whose task it is to develop, in an integrated manner, people’s programmes on the basis of a plan for the area. The Lok Karya Kshetra aims at developing new resources for the area and creating local leadership. This programme receives assistance from the State and is now being shared by other voluntary organisations.

To create social awakening and disseminate information about the problems of the country and the various Plan programmes, the Samaj has set up Jan Jagran (social enlightenment) centres. This is an assisted activity which is now becoming an integral part of the Lok Karya Kshetra programme. In the urban areas, the Samaj has given special attention to the problems of the slum-dwellers and has been running a number of night shelters for the homeless. THIRD FIVE YEAR PLAN members of this Committee are All India Cooperative Union, All India Women’s Conference, Bharat Sadhu Samaj, Bharat Scouts and Guides, Bharat Sevak

Samaj, Bharatiya Adim Jati Sangh, Bharatiya Grameen Mahila Sangh, Central Social Welfare Board, Gandhi Samarak Nidhi, Harijan Sevak Sangh, Indian Conference of Social Work, Indian Council for Child Welfare, Indian Red Cross Society, National Cadet Corps and Auxiliary Cadet Corps and Sarva Seva Sangh. 13. Construction. -Construction activity in the bigger projects as well as smaller and local works will remain the largest avenue for voluntary effort towards the utilisation of idle manpower. In villages, voluntary agencies will be encouraged and helped to take up construction work directly or through labour cooperatives.

This will lead to reduction of cost, observance of satisfactory standards of work, a better deal for the construction workers and the promotion of honest dealings in the working of the construction industry. Excessive dependence on contractors will be avoided and additional resources will become available for the programmes of the voluntary organisations. A Committee set up in the Planning Commission has made the following recommendations to enable the voluntary organisations like the Bharat Sevak Samaj to undertake construction work on a large scale : http://www. eralapsc. org/appli_4. htm http://www. education. nic. in [pic] http://www. education. nic. in/cd50years/12/8I/66/8I660A01. htm Environmental social service including personal hygiene, sanitation, home nursing, child care, care of the sick, sewing and tailoring etc. During the current financial year universities, State Govern- ments, the ational Cadet Corps of the Ministry of Defence and voluntary organisations, of which the most important are the Bharat Sevak Samaj and the Bharat Scouts and Guides, organised a large number of camps of different types all over the country.

During the period between 1st April, and 31st December, 1958 a sum of Rs. 32. 78 lakhs was sanctioned for holding 1,762 camps with a total strength of 1,38,987 campers. http://www. education. nic. in/cd50years/15/8P/8A/8P8A0703. htm SECOND FIVE YEAR PLAN 30. Young men and women and students from colleges and schools are taking an increasing share in the tasks of national development. The first five year plan made a special provision for youth camps and labour services.

Up to October 1955, at the instance of the Ministry of Education 795 youth camps had been organised in which 66,000 persons participated. These camps create a sense of dignity in manual labour, provide new interests and bring together different sections of the community. Valuable work has been done by the National Cadet Corps which has now a strength of 46,000 in its senior division, 64,000 in the junior division anti 8,000 in the girls division besides 3,000 teachers and others drawn from educational institutions. The Auxiliary Cadet Corps has now a strength of 750,000.

The Bharat Scouts and Guides have a membership of 438,405 scouts and 61,118 guides which represents an increase of 50 per cent since the beginning of the first plan. The Bharat Sevak Samaj has organised nearly 500 youth and students camps in which about 40,000 youth and students have taken part. All these organisations have ambitious programmes of development for the second five year plan. Youth and students have a unique contribution to make to the building of the nation and it is the aim of the plan to give them growing opportunities of service and participation. 31.

In connection with the formulation of the second five year plan, an effort has been recently initiated to secure the close association of teachers and students with work in the field of planning. At the suggestion of the Planning Commission, planning forums have been formed in a number of universities and colleges to enable teachers and students to consider problems relating to national development and to send their suggestions to the Planning Commission, State Governments and local bodies. It is hoped that in due course such forums or associations will be formed in all universities and other educational institutions.

By disseminating information and creating a more widespread under-standing of national, state and local plans and in organizing voluntary work or development projects, planning forums will provide valuable opportunities to teachers and students to contribute to the success of the second five year plan. 32. As a non-political and non-official organisation set up in pursuance of the first five year plan, the Bharat Sevak Samaj has served as a national platform for constructive work. It has now 31 Pradesh branches and 229 district branches, besides branches in ahsil or taluka towns and in villages. The total membership of persons who have agreed to give five hours of social service during the week now runs to 50,000. In addition to a small number of whole-time employees, the Bharat Sevak Samaj has been able to attract a number of retired and experienced public servants for its programme of work, which now includes social education, health and sanitation, labour cooperatives, work centres, youth and student camps, information centres and cultural activities.

Besides implementing its own programmes, the Bharat Sevak Samaj also works in association with other social service organisations. Five of its branches are running welfare extension projects under the schemes of the Central Social Welfare Board. Special arrangements have been made for training camp leaders. Some of the camps have been organised on behalf of education departments and university authorities. A youth organisation named the Bharat Yuvak Samaj has been recently sponsored by the Samaj.

Among activities undertaken by the Bharat Sevak Samaj, mention may be made of the construction of 16 1/2 miles of embankment at the Kosi project work on the Jumna bund, establishment of cooperative societies, assistance in the small savings movement and participation in local development works. 33. Many of the basic ideas of Gandhiji have become part of the national heritage. Methods and techniques which he and those associated with him in constructive work developed over many years have been found to be of great value of working rural programmes.

The tradition of service which they embodied and their emphasis on village reconstruction. http://education. nic. in/cd50years/15/8P/89/8P890J01. htm PUBLIC COOPERATION IN THE FIRST TWO PLANS 9. It was realised at the time of the formulation of the First Five Year Plan that for rapid progress public cooperation will have to be enlisted on a very large scale in every aspect of development The Bharat Sevak Samaj was formed to provide a common platform with the object of drawing out the available unused time and energy of the people and directing them into various fields of social and economic activity.

The Samaj has adopted a comprehensive programme and has branches all over the country. It has a large cadre of trained workers. Its association with the Kosi project during 1955-59 has brought forth evidence of the large possibilities of reducing cost, improving quality of performance and speeding up completion of various projects through public participation. Against the original estimates of Rs. 11. 5 crores, the actual expenditure on the Kosi embankment scheme came down to Rs. 6. 5 crores. The work was completed in 1958 against target date of 1960, i. e. 2 years in advance.

The Samaj has taken part on a smaller scale in the construction of several other irrigation and flood protection projects. Encouraged by its experience it has set up a Construction Service with branches in several States. It has undertaken construction of a variety of public works. The Organisation of works camps for students and youth of the country in connection with the Labour and Social Service Camps scheme of the Ministry of Education has become a major activity of the Samaj in which the contribution of the people is becoming available in an increasing measure.

A specific approach has now been worked out in respect of activities in the rural areas. A group of villages is selected as the field of activity of two or three trained social workers whose task it is to develop, in an integrated manner, people’s programmes on the basis of a plan for the area. The Lok Karya Kshetra aims at developing new resources for the area and creating local leadership. This programme receives assistance from the State and is now being shared by other voluntary organisations.

To create social awakening and disseminate information about the problems of the country and the various Plan programmes, the Samaj has set up Jan Jagran (social enlightenment) centres. This is an assisted activity which is now becoming an integral part of the Lok Karya Kshetra programme. In the urban areas, the Samaj has given special attention to the problems of the slum-dwellers and has been running a number of night shelters for the homeless. THIRD FIVE YEAR PLAN embers of this Committee are All India Cooperative Union, All India Women’s Conference, Bharat Sadhu Samaj, Bharat Scouts and Guides, Bharat Sevak Samaj, Bharatiya Adim Jati Sangh, Bharatiya Grameen Mahila Sangh, Central Social Welfare Board, Gandhi Samarak Nidhi, Harijan Sevak Sangh, Indian Conference of Social Work, Indian Council for Child Welfare, Indian Red Cross Society, National Cadet Corps and Auxiliary Cadet Corps and Sarva Seva Sangh. 13. Construction. Construction activity in the bigger projects as well as smaller and local works will remain the largest avenue for voluntary effort towards the utilisation of idle manpower. In villages, voluntary agencies will be encouraged and helped to take up construction work directly or through labour cooperatives. This will lead to reduction of cost, observance of satisfactory standards of work, a better deal for the construction workers and the promotion of honest dealings in the working of the construction industry.

Excessive dependence on contractors will be avoided and additional resources will become available for the programmes of the voluntary organisations. A Committee set up in the Planning Commission has made the following recommendations to enable the voluntary organisations like the Bharat Sevak Samaj to undertake construction work on a large scale : http://www. keralapsc. org/appli_4. htm [pic] viii) The upper age limit will be relaxed in the case of ex-employees of the Bharat Sevak Samaj engaged for the execution of any Scheme financed by the State or Central Government to the extent of their service in the Samaj provided they are otherwise qualified and provided further they shall not have passed 40 years of age on the Ist day of January of the year in which applications are invited. Such candidates shall produce along with their application a certificate obtained from the Pradesh Chairman of the Samaj stating that they had been appointed for the execution of the scheme mentioned above, as and when required by the Commission. 17) Participation in shramdan activities Organised by Government departments or Bharat Sevak Samaj – Please see decision No. 3 under Rule 15. (4) Bharat Sewak Samaj – Permission to central Government servants to join Ministries are aware that the Bharat Sewak Samaj is a nationwide, non-official and non-political organization recently started at the instance of the Planning Commission with the object of enabling individual citizens to contribute, in the form of an organized cooperative effort, to the implementation of the National Development Plan. . The Government of India are of the opinion that in view of the non-political and non-sectarian character of the Bharat Sewak Samaj and the nature of work in which it will be engaged, Government servants, should, if they so wish, be encouraged to join the organization and to participate in its activities provided this can be done without detriment to the proper discharge of the normal official duties. Ministries of Finance etc. re, therefore requested to observe the following instructions in this matter :- (1) Government servants wishing to join the Bharat Sewak Samaj should obtain prior permission from the appropriate Head of Office or Department concerned. (2) Permission should be freely granted, provided the Head of the Office or Department satisfies himself in each case that participation in the Samaj’s activities will not interfere with the due discharge by the Government servant concerned of his official duties.

If actual experience in any individual case or class of cases shows that this condition cannot be satisfied, the permission already granted may be revoked. (3) It should be made clear to all Government servants concerned that permission to participate in the activities of the Bharat Sewak Samaj will not absolve them from the due observance at all times of all the rules and instructions relating to the conduct and behaviour of Government servants, etc. [MHA OM No. 25/49/52-Ests. , dated 11. 10. 1952] http://persmin. nic. in/estt/CCSRules_1964/ccs_conduct_rules_1964_details. htm ) Participation in Shramdan activities organized by Government departments or the Bharat Sewak Samaj A question was raised recently whether central Government servants can be permitted to participate in a “Shramdan” drive organized by a State Government with the object of enabling the participants to devote some time and labour in furthering of the objects and work of public utility. Participation of a Government servant in such activity in his spare time is not only unobjectionable but even welcome subject, of course, to the consideration that such activity does not interfere with the performance of his official duties.

It is, in fact, considered desirable that Government servants should be encouraged to participate in such activities so long as official duties of the employees concerned are not unduly interfered with. The Ministry of Finance etc. are requested to inform the Departments and offices under them accordingly. It should however, be made clear that these instructions apply only to activities organized by Government departments or the Bharat Sevak Samaj and not by private organizations. MHA OM No. 25/8/55-Ests. (A), dated 03. 05. 1955] http://rural. nic. in [pic] http://rural. nic. in/RightInfo/Establishment. htm Items Specific to  Public Cooperation Section                                       (List – B) |S. No. |Type of cases |Final Level of |Channel of Submission | | | |Disposal |above the Section Level | |1. National Fund for Rural Development (NFRD) |  |  | |  |i) Operational aspects such as acceptance of donations, issuing of |JS |US/DS-JS | | |receipts, operation of bank accounts, issue of sanctions, maintenance | | | | |of accounts etc. | | | |  |ii) Project proposals – examination thereof, seeking comments of |DS |US-DS | | |concerned divisions/Deptts. State Govts. etc. I. B. clearance, | | | | |monitoring of projects including field visits | | | |  |iii) Residual matters relating to Section 35 CC and 35 CCA including |DS |US-DS | | |High Level Non-statutory Committee | | | |2. Examination and processing of proposals received from voluntary |JS |US/DS-JS | | |organisations for recommendations for allotments of land and for | | | | |acceptance, of foreign funds,  for clearance of visits of foreign | | | | |voluntary leaders to public cooperation projects in India | | | |3. Residual work including settlement of accounts for the promotion and |DS |US-DS | | |strengthening of Yuvak and Mahila Mandals | | | |4. |Residual work on Bharat Sevak Samaj:- |  |  | |  |i) Court cases on BSS affairs transferred by the Deptt. f Civil |JS |US/DS-JS | | |Supplies | | | |  |ii) Settlement of accounts in respect of amount released by the Deptt. |DS |US-DS | | |of R. D | | | |5. |Residual work regarding Kudal Commission Report |DS |US-DS | ttp://lawcommissionofindia. nic. in [pic] 191ST REPORT ON 2004 (ix)       The Government of Kerala has welcomed the proposals. However, it is suggested that instead of a Regulatory Authority, the same functions can be performed by a Special Audit Team, in the Finance Department. The discretion not being a regular feature, a permanent regulatory authority may lead to waste of money. For some reasons there is no need to have a separate judicial authority. The role of the Red Cross or Bharat Sevak Samaj may be kept separate. ttp://persmin. nic. in/estt/ccs%20brochures. doc CCS (CONDUCT) RULES, 1964 BROCHURE ON CENTRAL CIVIL SERVICES (CONDUCT) RULES, 1964 GOVERNMENT OF INDIA (DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL ; TRAINING) CONTENTS THE CENTRAL CIVIL SERVICES (CONDUCT) RULES, 1964 FOREWORD |  |(17) |Participation in Shramdan/in activities organized by government departments or the |25 | | | |Bharat Sewak Samaj – please see decision No. 3 under Rule 15 | | |15A. SUB-LETTING AND VACATION OF GOVERNMENT ACCOMMODATION | | |  |Government of India Decisions | | |  |(2) |Participation in Shramdan activities organized by Government departments or the |85 | | | |Bharat Sewak Samaj [MHA OM No. 25/8/55-Estt. (A), dated 03. 05. 1955] | | 17)      Participation in shramdan activities Organised by Government departments or Bharat Sevak Samaj – Please see decision No. 3 under Rule 15. (4)        Bharat Sewak Samaj – Permission to central Government servants to join Government of India Decisions Ministries are aware that the Bharat Sewak Samaj is a nationwide, non-official and non-political organization recently started at the instance of the Planning Commission with the object of enabling individual citizens to contribute, in the form of an organized cooperative effort, to the implementation of the National Development Plan. . The Government of India are of the opinion that in view of the non-political and non-sectarian character of the Bharat Sewak Samaj and the nature of work in which it will be engaged, Government servants, should, if they so wish, be encouraged to join the organization and to participate in its activities provided this can be done without detriment to the proper discharge of the normal official duties. Ministries of Finance etc. re, therefore requested to observe the following instructions in this matter :- (1)        Government servants wishing to join the Bharat Sewak Samaj should obtain prior permission from the appropriate Head of Office or Department concerned. (2)        Permission should be freely granted, provided the Head of the Office or Department satisfies himself in each case that participation in the Samaj’s activities will not interfere with the due discharge by the Government servant concerned of his official duties. If actual experience in any individual case or class of cases shows that this ondition cannot be satisfied, the permission already granted may be revoked. (3)        It should be made clear to all Government servants concerned that permission to participate in the activities of the Bharat Sewak Samaj will not absolve them from the due observance at all times of all the rules and instructions relating to the conduct and behaviour of Government servants, etc. Members of IOSN The Following Schools are having the Internet connections and they are the members of the Indian Open Schooling Network (IOSN). To know more about any school just click over the school • Bharat Sevak Samaj, Kerala

Bharat Sevak Samaj, Kerala This School is headed by B. S. Balachandran. http://meghalaya. nic. in/raj_bhavan/bio. htm [pic] |Bio-data of Shri M. M. Jacob | |  | |Shri Mundakkal Mathew Jacob was born at Ramapuram, Kottayam District, Kerala State to Shri Ulahanan Mathew and Shrimati Rosamma | |Mundakkal. He married Achamma Kunnuthara from Tiruvalla, Kerala (since deceased) and has four daughters Jaya, Jessy, Elizabeth, and| |Rachel.

He was appointed Governor of Meghalaya in 1995 and again in 2000 for a second term. He also discharged the function of the | |Governor of Arunachal Pradesh as well for some time in 1996. | |Bharat Sevak Samaj functionary | |Shri Jacob joined Bharat Sevak Samaj in 1954, which is a non-political voluntary organisation, with Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru| |as its President and Gulzarilal Nanda, Union Minister, as Chairman, commenced work to enlist public cooperation for

India’s Planned| |development. Jacob served as Camp Director to train voluntary workers for the B. S. S. at the first such camp held in Kerala in 1954. | |Thereafter, he moved to the National Capital Delhi and conducted Camp leaders’ and Camp organisers’ training programmes for almost | |two years. He also worked as Zonal Organiser for South India for “labour and social service camps for student and youth” – a scheme| |under the Union Ministry of Education.

Later he took the assignment as Chairman, Bharat Sevak Samaj, Kerala State and | |Vice-Chairman, Central B. S. S New Delhi. | |Shri Jacob served as Training Supervisor and Liaison Officer for the Pilot Project – “Work and Orientation Centre” at Kalamasserry,| |Cochin to train unemployed educated youth in various trades and crafts – a scheme formulated by the Govt. of India, Ministry of | |Labour – in 1957. |He worked as full time Social Worker and organised various programmes like Lok Karya Kshetras, Urban Social Welfare Projects, Slum | |Service Centres, night shelters, and Plan information centres at the instance of the Public Cooperation Division of the Planning | |Commission through B. S. S. He represented central B. S. S in the All India Panchayat Parishad-Conference held at Udaipur with the | |initiative of the then Union Minister, S. K. Dey, and attended by Local self-government, Ministers of various States, and national | |leaders like Jaya Prakash Narain. | | |UNESCO | | | |On behalf of the youth section of UNESCO International Coordination Committee Work Camps and Bharat Sevak Samaj, International Work| |Camps for peace were held in several parts of India such as Bangalore and Bariapur (West Bengal). Shri Jacob was one of the main | |leaders who organised and conducted these camps.

On behalf of International Coordination Committee for work camps for peace UNESCO,| |Paris, Shri Jacob served as Advisor to work camps for Rural Development in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) in 1960. | |In India, Shri Jacob toured various parts of the country organising and conducting labour and social service camps for students and| |youth, including many inter-state youth camps. Shri Jacob served as organiser and Director of the Gandhi Centenary National | |Integration Inter University Camp at Trivandrum. | http://ceodelhi. nic. n [pic] http://ceodelhi. nic. in/Erolls/PDF/English/A069/A0690077. pdf http://www. keralaplanningboard. org [pic] http://www. keralaplanningboard. org/html/EconomicReview2005/chapter10. pdf CHAPTER 10 INFRASTRUCTURE Presence of quality infrastructure is vital for social, economic and industrial development of the country. The Transport infrastructure in India largely consists of roads, railways, air and inland water. As regards roads, it occupies prime position because even for using other modes of transport road is needed.

Roads cover every corner of the country that the railway could not even cover. 10. 2 The most important challenge in the road sector revolves around building all weather roads connecting each and every village. Even though Kerala is comparatively better placed than most other States, as regards road length, the condition of many of these roads is very poor. Therefore, the main emphasis under road development in Kerala has been on improvement and upgradation of existing roads rather than construction of new roads.

The investment need in the road sector is of high magnitudes that are beyond the resources available with the Government. Therefore, there is an imperative need to motivate the private and other non-governmental agencies/corporate sectors to participate in road construction and upgradation especially in the projects like express ways and selected highways. It is therefore, imperative to strengthen the road infrastructure for carrying out all sorts of development. Details of loan sanctioned to various agencies/Institutions (as on 30. . 2005) Sl. No Name of Agency/Institution Amount (Rs. lakhs) 1 KSRTC 20534. 50 2 SRTO (Small Road Transport Operators)                  2935. 11 3 Kerala Ceramics Ltd                                               4. 46 4 Qetcos                                                                    4. 94 5 Bharath Sevak Samaj                                            4. 68 6 Hantex                                                                    4. 50 7 Captex                                                                    7. 0 8 Housing Loan                                                          1155. 33 9 Personal Loan                                                         48. 30 10 Loans for purchase of vehicles                               695. 49 11 Loans for purchase of new vehicles under officers scheme                                                          88. 54 Source :KTDFC http://www. unitus. com [pic] http://www. mcgm. gov. in/forms/grindex1. aspx [pic] http://www. mcgm. gov. in/RTI/IndMan-WardL-09. pdf http://www. global-mechanism. rg [pic] http://www. global-mechanism. org/dynamic/documents/document_file/ cop1dec. pdf UNITED NATIONS Convention to Combat Desertification Distr. GENERAL ICCD/COP(1)/11/Add. 1 22 December 1997 ORIGINAL: ENGLISH CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES ON ITS FIRST SESSION, HELD IN ROME FROM 29 SEPTEMBER TO 10 OCTOBER 1997 Addendum PART TWO: ACTIONS TAKEN BY THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES AT ITS FIRST SESSION ICCD/COP(1)/11/Add. 1 Page 91 336. Rajasthan Pradesh Bharat Sevak Samaj, India http://www. ndiasocial. org/bharatsewaksamaj/activity. htm [pic] BHARAT SEVAK SAMAJ is a Nonpolitical, Non-official and an All India Voluntary Organisation. It was founded by illustrious Bharat Ratan Pt. Jawahar Lal Nehru, as its founder president and Bharat Ratna Gulzari Lal Nanda, as Chairman. They were assisted by a team of eminent social leaders. Presently, a veteran freedom fighter and eminent social and political leader Shri Ram Niwas Mirdha is the President and Swami Harinarayane Nanda is the Chairman of central Bharat Sevak Samaj.

The Samaj primarily aimed at people’s participation and cooperation in National Developmental activities both in social and economic sphare as well as moral regeneration of the people for all round prosperity. It has been inspired by the ideal of true service to the needy people without transcending the man – made barriers and keen to relieve distress and come to the help of suffering mankind whether such sufferings are due to man made calamities or the result of natural disaster.

The aim is also to fight against the forces of corruption in public life, communalism and to organise welfare activities in sensitive areas with focus to help weaker section of the society especially children and women. Pradesh Branches were set up all over the country. Delhi Pradesh BSS has the distinct honor of being the first state unit to open in 1952 with Smt. Indira Gandhi as its Chairperson. After sometime Shri Brij Krishan Chandiwala Popular known as “BHAI JI”, a true Gandhian and a veteran Freedom Fighter was nominated as Pradesh Convener.

It was Bhai Ji who, associated by a galaxy of Social Leaders of Delhi, organised numerous constructive activities all over Delhi particularly in slums, Labour Camps i. e. Jhuggi- Jhonpris Bastis and villages to serve the poor and the needy from weaker sections. The Society was divided into Zones and Districts mainly conforming to the parliamentary and assemblies constituencies. Zonal and District Chairmen are appointed by the Pradesh Chairman and they are assisted by a team of dedicated social workers of the respective areas.

Bharat Sewak Samaj, Delhi Pradesh, has always been in the forefront in the matters of social welfare work, ever since its inception. The founder president and founder chairman had already laid before the Samaj a program to identify and develop avenues of voluntary service for the citizens of India, in order to promote national sufficiency and promote economic stability and social well being of the people of the country. The Samaj has been trying its best for the last about fifty years to keep marching on the path thus indicated.

Inspite of acute financial difficulties, which BSS Delhi Pradesh has been facing for quite a number of years its endeavor in the field of service to the poor and under privileged people living in various parts of the capital, continue unabated. It is mainly due to the indefatigable and devoted perseverance of our workers that our social welfare centers continue functioning. Credit for all this goes to workers, members, and office bearers in the district branches, and in the Pradesh office who have worked with dedication and zeal under the able guidance of Pradesh president chairman K.

Surrendar Saini. Children’s Day November 14th has a special significance for our educational centers. A common function is held at which the children and teachers of all centers assemble and present cultural programs, the central theme of which is national integration . The day coinciding as it does with the birthday of Chacha Nehru reminds us all of the high ideals, which the great leader had put before us and for which he worked all his life. Educational Centers Trained nursery teachers manage the balwaris and balwari-cum-primary schools of the Samaj and some have even trained graduates.

Due to paucity of funds the Samaj cannot afford to pay the teachers and other members of the staff adequately, but that has not dampened the spirit of service and devotion of the workers. As a result, the quality of instruction imparted to children at these centers compares very well with other schools, which have ample funds at their disposal. Our schools give due attention to cultural and extra curriculum activities also. The above mentioned welfare centers are located n Delhi gate, NabiKarim(Paharganj), Manakpura, North Avenue, Naroji Nagar, Sarojini Nagar and Seelampur. Women Crafts Centers The Women crafts centers of the Samaj impart training in sewing, cutting, stitching and needle work, thus enabling the trainees, who are housewives, or would-be-brides, to be efficient in their role and augment their family income or effect saving on stiching of family garments. The Samaj intends to convert these training centers into training-cum-production centers so that order work may be secured for the trained ladies of the area.

But the implementation of this proposal has to wait till the Samaj is out of financial difficulties it is presently confronted with. Night Shelters Or Rain Baseras We had five night shelters, Apna Ghar, or rain baseras as they are popularly known and were located in Delhi gate, Nabikarim, Paharganj, Shadipur, Motinagar, Manakpura, North Avenue, Panchkuian Road and Naroji Nagar. These have been closed since government and local bodies have opened night shelters and BSS has constraints of fund. Legal Aid and Advice Bureau

The Legal aid and advice bureau of Bharat Sewak Samaj has rendered yeomen service to the poor and needy litigants. The bureau has been able to do its little bit by preventing eviction of slum dwellers, securing compensation awards in accident cases, getting reinstatement of discharged workmen, getting relief to the widows and destitute women, legal separation and or restitution of conjugal rights and defending divorce proceedings, applications for the grant of succession certificates. So far about 4000 persons have sought its help in their various legal problems.

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