Costing Sheets

I have a dish of grilled lamb chops with tomatoes and olives, honey lime carrots, and roasted red potatoes with garlic and rosemary. After costing out every item in the recipe I got a subtotal of $104. 56. Once I introduced a Q-factor of 3% into the costing, I came up with a subtotal with Q-factor of $107. 70. My yield of the dishes is 10 plates, so taking the subtotal with a Q-factor and dividing it by 10, makes it $10. 77 per dish, then add in a dollar for extra cost makes it $11. 7 per plate. My restaurant wants a food cost of 33%, so factoring that in it makes it $35. 67 for a suggested menu selling price. In all reality I can sell this dish for $34. 00, setting the food cost at 34. 6%. With my restaurant being a fine dining Yacht Club, shirt and tie facility, I can up price my dishes. You need to be a member to enter the restaurant, and it is no cheap membership. With a prepared lamb dish people will sell some good money to eat well.

Also with lamb being one of the tenderest meats on the market it sells itself, when you get a piece of meat that melts in your mouth you will fork out the money. On a terrible turn of events all the red bliss potato population was tragically corrupted. I had to substitute the red potatoes with a buttercup fingerling potato, which is in season from September to October. They are a great buy for the exoticness of them. Buttercup fingerling potatoes are priced at $50. 00 a case of 50, or $1. 0 for one potato. In replacing the potatoes it brings my subtotal to 131. 38, then adding a 3% Q-factor it makes it $134. 52. Dividing that by the yield, it makes it $13. 45 a dish, and then adding extra cost it makes it $14. 45 a dish. With the 33% desired food cost it makes it $43. 78 for suggested selling price. With having to sell my dish at $34. 00, it really hurts that I cannot set a better price, but thankfully we can make up our money on the alcohol sales.

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