Export of Marine Products from India

India’s marine product exports have for the first time crossed $2 billion, according to official figures for financial year 2009-10 released. Recession in the international market has not impacted the export of marine products from the country, the Marine Products Exports Development Authority said. In terms of volumes too, 2009-10 was exceptional, it added. Exports aggregated 663,603 tonnes valued at Rs. 9,921. 46 crore. In terms of US dollars, it was $2,105. 60 million. Compared to the previous year, there was 10. 8 percent growth in volume, 15. 26 percent in rupee earning and 10. 32 percent growth in US dollar earnings. Frozen shrimp continued to be the major export item accounting for 41. 74 percent of the total dollar earnings. Fish, the principal export item in terms of volume and the second largest in value terms, accounted for 38. 37 percent in quantity and 20. 09 percent in dollar earnings. Export of live lobster, live crab and Baigai (little water snail) showed an increase in exports. However, the export of ornamental fish showed a declining trend, mainly because of a ban on export of Denisonii by the Kerala government.

The European Union remained the largest market with a share of 30. 07 percent in dollar realization, followed by China with a share of 17. 73 percent and Japan 12. 96 p The fishery production is around 125 million tons. China, Japan, India, U. S. A. , Russian federation, Indonesia and Chile are the major fish producing countries. Out of this India holds a third position in the world production. Currently, India’s total annual fish production is 5. 65 million tons (Inland-2. 8 million tons and Marine-2. 83 million tons). But India has an estimated potential of about 8. 4 million tons (Inland 4. 50 and marine3. 0 million tons). This vast untapped potential can be utilized successfully to uplift India’s fish trade in the international market and secure a position for India fish in the world. EXPORT OF MARINE PRODUCTS FROM INDIA 2009-10 Export trend Since the fall in the export earnings during 2003-04, the dollar earnings have increased steadily till 2009-10 EXPORT TREND OF MARINE PRODUCTS Q: Quantity in MT, V: Value Rs. Crore, $: US Dollar in Million   Year |   | Export | Variation |    (%) | U. V. | 2002-03 | Q | 467297 | +42827 | +10. 09 |  | | V | 6881. 31 | +924. 26 | +15. 52 | 147. 26 | | $ | 1424. 90 | +171. 5 | +13. 69 | 3. 05 | 2003-04 | Q | 412017 | -55280 | -11. 83 | | | V | 6091. 95 | -789. 36 | -11. 47 | 147. 86 | | $ | 1330. 76 | -94. 14 | -6. 61 | 3. 23 | 2004-05 | Q | 461329 | 49312 | 11. 97 | | | V | 6646. 69 | 554. 74 | 9. 11 | 144. 08 | | $ | 1478. 48 | 147. 71 | 11. 10 | 3. 20 | 2005-06 | Q | 512164 | 50835 | 11. 02 | | | V | 7245. 30 | 598. 61 | 9. 05 | 141. 46 | | $ | 1644. 21 | 165. 74 | 11. 21 | 3. 21 | 2006-07| Q | 612641| 100478| 19. 62|  | | V | 8363. 53| 1118. 23| 15. 43| 136. 52| | $ | 1852. 93| 208. 72| 12. 69| 3. 02| 2007-08| Q | 541701| -70941| -11. 58|  | | V | 7620. 92| -742. 61| -8. 88| 140. 8| | $ | 1899. 09| 46. 16| 2. 49| 3. 51| 2008-09| Q | 602835| 61135| 11. 29|  | | V | 8607. 94| 987. 02| 12. 95| 142. 79| | $ | 1908. 63| 9. 53| 0. 50| 3. 17| 2009-10| Q | 678436| 75601| 12. 54|  | | V | 10048. 53| 1440. 59| 16. 74| 148. 11| | $ | 2132. 84| 224. 21| 11. 75| 3. 14| During 2009-10 for the first time in the history of Marine product exports, the export earnings have crossed 2 billion US dollars and Rs. 10,000 crore mark. Export has crossed all previous records in quantity , rupee value and US $ terms. Exports aggregated to 678436 tonnes valued at Rs. 10048. 53 crore and US Dollar 2132. 84 million.

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Compared to the previous year, this recorded. a growth of 12. 54% in quantity, 16. 74% in rupee earning and 11. 75% growth in US $ earnings. Major items of export Frozen shrimp continued to be the major export item accounting for 41. 40% of  the total US$  earnings. Shrimp exports during the period increased by 3. 58%, 10. 65% and 5. 21% in quantity, rupee value and US $ value respectively. There is a slight increase in unit value realization of 1. 57%. Fish, the principal export item in quantity  terms and the second largest export item in value terms, accounted for a share of about 38. 47% in quantity and 20. 1% in US $ earnings. There is an increase of value realization of Ribbon fish inspite of the short fall in quantity by 12. 45%. There was also good landing of Leather Jacket. Frozen mackerel, Anchovy, Kati fish etc. also showed a positive growth where as Tuna export has considerably decreased, Fr. Cuttlefish recorded a growth of 25. 13%, 21. 39% and 16. 30% in quantity, rupee value and dollar terms respectively. However, there is a decline in the unit value realization (7. 06%). Items like dried items, live items and chilled items also showed a substantial growth compared to previous year. Export of Fr.

Squid showed an increase in quantity but there is a fall ;in rupee & US dollar realization. Unit value realization also declined by 13. 95%. Export of Live Lobster, Live crab and Baigai showed an increase in exports where as the export of Ornamental fish showed a decline in US $ terms. FO A Delicious Variety of Freshwater Fishes Two very important facets of the Indian economy is fishery and aquaculture. Out of this, Andhra Pradesh accounts for about 25-30% of India’s total seafood exports. India is a land of exotic fishes. A huge variety of India fish are available in the coastal waters of India, harvested by local fishermen.

These fish can be put under the heading of India fish. There is a great demand for India fish in the world market. An exotic variety of India fish are exported to countries all over the world. India fish is very delectable and greatly in demand in the western countries. Indian cooking is more inclined towards spicy food and the west is showing a definite but gradual inclination towards this kind of food. The Western world has now acquired a taste for spicy food, as compared to the bland food which was their normal intake before. In order to make eating a rich experience, the demand for Indian fish is now on the rise.

Indian fishes can be flavoured and cooked in very many ways. The use of special Indian spices and herbs make them even tastier. Fish from India now definitely forms a part of their lunches and dinners. A lot of restaurants in the West now cater to variety of imported India fish which are imported from India. Siam Canadian exports an immense variety of high quality fishes from India and keeps up a steady supply of these fishes to the world market. The various types of fishes are: Tilapia, which is imported Whole Round, Whole Gutted, or even fillets. Hilsa, one of the tastiest of Indian fishes sold Whole Round.

Another variety of white fish is Rohu, which is sold as Whole Gutted or Steaks – Block Frozen. Mrigal is sold Whole Gutted. Ayer, another flaky white fish is sold Whole Gutted or Steaks – Block Frozen. Boal is sold Whole Gutted, Catla as Whole Gutted or Block Frozen Steaks. Another very delicious variety of fish is Chital, which is sold Whole Gutted. Some other varieties of India fish which we sell are Reef Cod, Spanish, Mackerel, Indian Mackerel, Pomfret, Ribbon fish, Black Sea Bream and Sardines. Siam Canadian works with local factory in India – Vishakapatnam, although it is a Thailand based company.

These locally interlinked offices provide the expertise and knowledge of the local people. Fishes which fall under the category of India fish is harvested mainly in the coastal waters of Andhra Pradesh and Kerala. Soon after this, it is taken to the local Siam Canadian factory, where a very dedicated team checks the fish meat for quality. Only the top quality fishes are taken. It is then checked for germs for germs or micro bacterial organisms. Following this, the fish is frozen and packed into clean containers and shipped. At Siam Canadian, we also provide India fish at very competitive prices.

We cater to all your needs in the best possible manner. If you come to us, you will have no cause for complaint. Our procurement team procures India fish in bulk. Hence we can provide you with any amount that you need. Since 1987, we have been steadily growing and have now acquired a definite footing as a market leader. Our motto is to give maximum benefit to our customers. MAJOR ITEMWISE EXPORTS| Q: Quantity in Tons, | V: Value in Rs. Crores,| $: USD Million| ITEM| Share %|  | 2009-10| 2008-09| Variation| (%)| FROZEN SHRIMP| 19. 24| Q:| 130553| 126039| 4513. 66| 3. 58|  | 41. 62| V:| 4182. 35| 3779. 0| 402. 56| 10. 65| | 41. 40| $:| 883. 03| 839. 28| 43. 75| 5. 21| | UV$:|  | 6. 76| 6. 66| 0. 10| 1. 57| FROZEN FISH| 38. 47| Q:| 260979| 238544| 22435. 60| 9. 41|  | 20. 23| V:| 2032. 33| 1722. 34| 309. 99| 18. 00| | 20. 21| $:| 430. 94| 375. 24| 55. 70| 14. 84| | UV$:|  | 1. 65| 1. 57| 0. 08| 4. 97| FR CUTTLE FISH| 9. 36| Q:| 53504| 50750| 12754. 88| 25. 13|  | 9. 19| V:| 923. 83| 761. 05| 162. 78| 21. 39| | 9. 18| $:| 195. 69| 168. 27| 27. 42| 16. 30| | UV$:|  | 3. 08| 3. 32| -0. 23| -7. 06| FR SQUID| 9. 06| Q:| 61445| 57125| 4319. 15| 7. 56| | 6. 20| V:| 622. 63| 632. 35| -9. 71| -1. 54| | 6. 0| $:| 132. 24| 142. 87| -10. 63| -7. 44| | UV$:|  | 2. 15| 2. 50| -0. 35| -13. 95| DRIED ITEM| 6. 94| Q:| 47053| 31688| 15364. 71| 48. 49|  | 9. 76| V:| 981. 11| 420. 75| 560. 36| 133. 18| | 9. 79| $:| 208. 72| 92. 51| 116. 20| 125. 61| | UV$:|  | 4. 44| 2. 92| 1. 52| 51. 94| LIVE ITEMS| 0. 81| Q:| 5492| 3434| 2058. 27| 59. 93| | 1. 39| V:| 139. 14| 99. 00| 40. 14| 40. 55| | 1. 38| $:| 29. 52| 21. 82| 7. 69| 35. 24| | UV$:|  | 5. 37| 6. 36| -0. 98| -15. 44| CHILLED ITEMS| 4. 25| Q:| 28817| 21453| 7363. 60| 34. 33|  | 2. 63| V:| 264. 49| 217. 34| 47. 15| 21. 69| | 2. 62| $:| 55. 87| 48. 39| 7. 48| 15. 6| | UV$:|  | 1. 94| 2. 26| -0. 32| -14. 04| OTHERS| 11. 88| Q:| 80592| 73801| 6790. 85| 9. 2| | 8. 98| V:| 902. 84| 975. 33| -72. 68| -7. 45| | 9. 23| $:| 196. 84| 220. 24| -23. 40| -10. 62| | UV$:|  | 2. 44| 2. 98| -0. 54| -18. 15| TOTAL| 100| Q:| 678436| 602835| 75600. 73| 12. 54| | 100| V:| 10048. 53| 8607. 94| 1440. 59| 16. 74| | 100| $:| 2132. 84| 1908. 63| 224. 21| 11. 75| | UV$:|  | 3. 14| 3. 17| -0. 02| -0. 71| Major export markets European Union (EU), continued to be  the largest market  with a  share of  29. 89% in US $  realization. China maintained the second place with a share of 17. 0%, followed by Japan 13. 06%, USA 10. 01%, South East Asia 14. 76%, Middle East 5. 49% and Other Countries 8. 99%. Exports to countries like Libya, Reunion islands, Australia, Puertorico,  Dominican Republic, Kenya, Tanzania, Ukraine, Brazil etc. registered a positive growth. MAJOR REGIONWISE EXPORTS| Q: Quantity in Tons,| V: Value in Rs. Crores,| $: USD million| Country| Share %|  | 2009-10| 2008-09| Variation| (%)| JAPAN| 9. 24| Q:| 62690| 57271| 5419| 9. 46| | 12. 83| V:| 1289. 58| 1234. 04| 55. 56| 4. 50| | 13. 06| $:| 278. 58| 278. 62| -0. 05| -0. 02| USA| 4. 93| Q:| 33444| 36877| -3433| -9. 31| 10. 08| V:| 1012. 52| 1021. 55| -9. 03| -0. 88| | 10. 01| $:| 213. 52| 227. 29| -13. 76| -6. 06| EUROPEAN UNION| 24. 29| Q:| 164800| 155161| 9638| 6. 21|  | 29. 99| V:| 3013. 33| 2854. 07| 159. 27| 5. 58| | 29. 89| $:| 637. 40| 635. 34| 2. 06| 0. 32| CHINA| 21. 27| Q:| 144290| 147312| -3023| -2. 05| | 17. 82| V:| 1790. 89| 1296. 39| 494. 50| 38. 14| | 17. 80| $:| 379. 70| 281. 90| 97. 79| 34. 69| SOUTH EAST ASIA| 22. 01| Q:| 149353| 88953| 60400| 67. 90|  | 14. 72| V:| 1479. 55| 873. 09| 606. 46| 69. 46| | 14. 76| $:| 314. 85| 191. 08| 123. 77| 64. 78| MIDDLE EAST| 5. 15| Q:| 34907| 27177| 7730| 28. 4| | 5. 51| V:| 553. 55| 475. 72| 77. 83| 16. 36| | 5. 49| $:| 117. 05| 105. 20| 11. 85| 11. 26| OTHERS| 13. 11| Q:| 88953| 90083| -1130| -1. 25| | 9. 05| V:| 909. 11| 853. 11| 56. 00| 6. 56| | 8. 99| $:| 191. 77| 189. 22| 2. 55| 1. 35| Total| 100| Q:| 678436| 602835| 75601| 12. 54| | 100| V:| 10048. 53| 8607. 94| 1440. 59| 16. 74| | 100| $:| 2132. 84| 1908. 63| 221. 21| 11. 75| Port wise exports. Exports were affected from 19 Sea/land/air ports. The major ports in the order of US $ earnings were Pipavav (16. 94%) Kochi (15. 61%), JNP (15. 54%). Chennai (13. 03%), Vizag (9. 34%), Calcutta (8. 2%), Tuticorin (6. 81%), Mumbai (4. 59%), Mangalore (. 4. 01%) etc. Ports like Pipavav, JNP, Chennai, Kolkatta, Mumbai, Mangalore, Goa, Ahemedabad, Trivandrum and Agarthala have shown an increase in the exports compared to the previous year while ports like Vizag, Tuticorin, Hill Land Customs, Karimganj etc showed a declining trend. Export from Kochi port showed an increase in quantity as well as in rupee realization where as there was a decline in US $ terms by 0. 69%. Export from Mundra port also showed an increase in terms of quantity and rupee value however there was a short fall in US $ realization.

There was no export from ports like Kandla, NSICT and Port Blair. Details of port wise export are given in the table below. The Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA) Origin of MPEDA The Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA) was constituted in 1972 under the Marine Products Export Development Authority Act 1972 The role envisaged for the MPEDA under the statute is comprehensive – covering fisheries of all kinds, increasing exports, specifying standards, processing, marketing, extension and training in various aspects of the industry. Structure, Activities ;amp; Network

MPEDA functions under the Ministry of Commerce, Government of India and acts as a coordinating agency with different Central and State Government establishments engaged in fishery production and allied activities. Standing Committees of MPEDA * Executiv Committee * Technical Committee * Export Promotion Committee The plan schemes of the Authority are implemented under seven major heads: * Market Promotion * Capture Fisheris * Culture Fisheries * Processing infrastructure ;amp; value addition * Quality control * Research and development * Viability gap funding Work programme of MPEDA ) Registration of infrastructure facilities for seafood Export trade 2) Collection and dissemination of trade information 3) Projection of Indian marine products in overseas markets by participation in overseas fairs and organising international seafood fairs in India. 4) Implementation of development measures vital to the industry like distribution of insulated fish boxes, putting up fish landing platforms, improvement of peeling sheds, modernisation of industry such as upgrading of plate freezers, installation of IQF machinery, generator sets, ice making machineries, quality control laboratory etc. ) Promotion of  aquaculture for production of  shrimp and prawn for export. 6) Promotion of value added Seafoods. 7) Promotion of Tuna fishery. 8) Implementation of organic farming. 9) Conservation management. INDIA’S SEAFOOD RESOURCE INDIA’S SEAFOOD RESOURCEDI India’s seafood resources | India with a long coast line of 8129 Kms, two million sq. kms of Exclusive Economic Zone and 1. 2 million hectors of brackish water bodies, offers vast potential for development of fisheries. Against an estimated fishery potential of 3. 9 million tones from marine sector, only 2. million tones are tapped. Fishing efforts are largely confined to the inshore waters through artisanal, traditional, mechanised sectors. About 90% of the present production from the marine sector is from within a depth range of up to 50 to 70 meters and remaining 10% from depths extending up to 200 meters. While 93% of the production is contributed by artisanal, mechanised and motorised sector, the remaining 7% is contributed by deep sea fishing fleets confining their operation mainly to the shrimp grounds in the upper East Coast.

Built up Capacity of the Indian seafood Industry Name of the State| No. of Exporters| No. of Process Plants| Freezing Capacity (Ton. p/d)| No. of Cold Storages| Storage Capacity| No. of Fishing Vessels | Kerala| 287| 124| 1585. 77| 169| 23086. 50| 2963| Tamil Nadu| 286| 48| 524. 55| 67| 5900. 00| 1562| Karnataka| 43| 14| 186. 40| 26| 3540. 00| 3226| Andhra Pradesh| 95| 52| 779. 50| 53| 7200. 00| 717| Goa| 9| 7| 104. 00| 9| 1275. 00| 420| Gujarath| 64| 55| 2216. 03| 57| 22925. 00| 426| Orissa| 30| 21| 220. 00| 20| 2460. 00| 414| Maharastra| 268| 41| 1327. 11| 39| 19372. 0| 2932| West Bengal| 99| 37| 340. 00| 30| 3500. 00| 0| Delhi (UT)| 92| –| 0. 00| 1| 15. 00| 0| OO I IA’S S The marine products exports are benefited by Special Focus initiatives. SPECIAL FOCUS INITIATIVES Marine Sector * Imports for technological upgradation under EPCG in fisheries sector (except fishing trawlers, ships, boats and other similar items) exempted from maintaining average export obligation. * Duty free import of specified specialized inputs / chemicals and flavouring oils is allowed to the extent of 1% of FOB value of preceding financial year’s export. To allow import of monofilament longline system for tuna fishing at a concessional rate of duty and Bait Fish for tuna fishing at Nil duty. * A self  removal procedure for clearance of seafood waste is applicable subject to prescribed wastage norms. * Marine products are considered for VKGUY scheme. http://www. siamcanadian. com/india-fish/potential. htm Credit facilities have helped the India Fish Industry immensely Credit has been provided for aquaculture mainly by banks and NABARD has also played a very vital role in the credit schemes of marine, inland and brackish water aquaculture.

This credit facility is mainly used for processing, packaging, preservation, transportation and marketing of India fish, fish products, prawn culture etc. With this credit money new ponds can be developed, old ponds can be expanded, quality feed can be manufactured and many such other things. Manual and mechanized boats can be improved upon. Their capacity can be increased and additional gears, nets and other equipments may be added. The initial credit given by the banks for the India fish fishery industry was Rs 4480 million in 1998-99 and this increased to Rs 5980 million in 2001-2.

NABARD refinance also went up from Rs 297 million in 1998-99 to Rs 347 million in 2002-3. Apart from giving a financial boost, the central and state governments have laid down certain guidelines and policies also. In order to provide education to the fisheries, the Indian Council Of Educational Research has set up a research institute. Financially vulnerable farmers have been given help especially for aquaculture of India fish.. Areas where aquaculture is possible is identified by the government and guidelines are given to the farmers.

Certain regulatory measures are taken in order to prevent over harvesting of India fish.. They also try to protect the interests of small fish producers. A program has been initiated by FAO and NABARD to provide micro finance and women in the coastal areas to become financially independent. This can go a long way in the alleviation of poverty because it will also supplement the family income. The corporate sector has done its bit by introducing advanced technology for increased production of India fish, exports and prawn culture.

They invest in high powered fishing vessels and put up freezing plants. This goes a long way in the total enhancement of the fishery division. The corporate sector has spent around Rs 600 million, especially for shrimp farming and its exports. All these avenues which provide financial, as well as technical help, go a long to remove fishermen from the poverty line, as well as give a big boost to the India fishing industry. Description-Financial aid and technical guidance provided by the financial and educational institutions for the aquaculture of India fish.

Future Prospects for Marine Products Export Industry  Marine products have created a sensation in the world market because of their high health attributes. With the high unit value, seafood has been acclaimed as one of the fastest moving commodity in the world market. The world market for seafood has doubled within the last decade reaching US $49. 32 billion mark India’s share is 2. 4%, dependence on shrimp as a product and is changing due to the increased attention given on other fishery resource like squid, cuttlefish, fin fish, etc. and penetrating into markets of Western Europe and South East Asia.

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