The Girl Who Forgot to Sing Badly Review

Drama play review – The Girl Who Forgot To Sing Badly On entering the Ark Theatre, having never been before, I noticed art structures that were directed specifically to children. The interior was decorated with colourful designs. I felt the building was very child friendly and noticed a group of children commenting on a structure in particular saying how it was “cool”. The children were immediately directed into their seats in the theatre upon arrival.

I thought this was very good as the children did not have to wait around to be seated. The play, The Girl Who Forgot To Sing Badly, is written by Finnegan Kruckemeyer and directed by Lynne Parker. The play itself is a story pitched at 7 year olds and over. The story is narrated by Louis Lovett, who also plays five different characters throughout the play. Lovett plays a girl called Peggy O’Hegarty, whose parents are packers until one day; the phone doesn’t ring, causing utter mayhem.

The story escalades into the reason the phone doesn’t ring and Peggy is sent on an adventure to save the city, meeting the Man and his mouse, Hildegard, along the way. Before attending the play, I had reservations about the fact that it was a one man show and was intrigued as to how Lovett was going to be able to hold his audience’s attention. I thought the play was very imaginative bearing curiosity from the title, The Girl Who Forgot To Sing Badly. Louis Lovett was able to engage the audience in the story throughout.

I thought it was very good that he listed off what to expect in the play, so that when he supposedly forgot to include these aspects, the audience were able to inform him. For example, after hearing that there would be blood in the play, the children, being an audience of mainly boys, would shout, “You forgot the blood! ” The play engaged every member of the audience in terms of the story and the set design. I noticed many children commenting amongst the peers as to how Lovett was able to do certain things with the props.

The story line treated issues such as unemployment. A topic that children have heard of on a day to day basis, more than ever at the moment, but are not informed of. I thought this theme was evident throughout in that Peggy and her family were packers despite the fact that they were not being called for any jobs. I considered it to be a great learning experience for myself as I was amazed to see how well Lovett performed such a great production on his own. It inspired me with more ideas that can be used in my own practice.

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